Pilates & Pregnancy Guidelines



Should you care?? 😟 You could get sued for:

- Not following proper pre-screening for any health conditions or medical concerns for pre and postnatal clients.

- Not knowing the most current industry standard and guidelines for pre and postnatal clients.


YES, you should care!


This is what I warn about repeatedly when it comes to duty of care for your pre and postnatal clients!


You SHOULD NOT allow a postnatal client to come back to Pilates until 6 weeks after delivery for a natural birth and 3 months for a Cesarean delivery unless you have explicit permission from their GP, Pelvic Health Physio or Obstetrician. If something goes wrong (like pelvic floor prolapse, or abdominal hernia) you can be sued. 😟


Just because someone has been doing Pilates for 10 years, does not mean they can start back two weeks after delivery.


Just because someone is your most loyal client, does not mean they can start back two weeks after delivery.


Just because they are paying you, does not mean they can start back two weeks after delivery.


Just because they are an advanced Pilates client does not mean they can start back two weeks after delivery.


Just because they are a new client does not mean they can start back two weeks after delivery.


If you start someone early without approval from their GP, Pelvic Health Physio or Obstetrician, you are not looking after your client or their best interest, and yes, you can be sued. And, yes, they can sue you for damages from exercising too early if a prolapse or hernia results.


How can you avoid this?


Always get written permission from their GP, Pelvic Health Physio or Obstetrician to start Pilates prior to 6 weeks after a natural delivery or 3 months after a Cesarean deliver.


✅ASK them for this document! Get written permission, and save that permission to their client file. 🙂Then you can start working with them early, and follow current guidelines!

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